Training Insights… Adventures in Diving Part 3: Who are your potential Adventure Divers?

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Any qualified diver can choose to explore the underwater world in new and different ways. PADI Adventure Dives linked to Specialty Diver courses teach existing divers new techniques and give them the tools and knowledge they need to enhance their diving exploration.

There are over 25 Specialty courses available, covering a vast range of topic from photography to dive equipment and from marine life to wreck diving. There really is something to suit every diver!

PADI (Junior) Open Water Divers who are at least 10 years old can enrol in an Adventure Diver course. Young divers may only participate in certain Adventures Dives – check the PADI Instructor Manual for more information on pre-requisites.

Top tips to attract new Adventure Divers

  • Use your existing customer database to send email newsletters and offers to promote upcoming adventure dives or special offers.
  • Make sure you include plenty of information during your PADI Open Water Diver courses so that your new, keen students will know what their next step will be and how easy it is for them to carry on their training. Many divers will get the bug after their first course and this is a great time to encourage them to book the next one.
  • Offer special packages to help cross-sell your courses and equipment, for example:
      • Digital Underwater Photographer adventure dive bundled with a new camera and accessory sales offer
      • 2.7.12.1-scuba-accessoriesDeep Diver and Wreck Diver adventure dives bundled with a discounted dive trip to a local deep wreck site
      • Drysuit Diver and Ice Diver adventure dives plus a discount on new drysuits
      • Underwater Navigator adventure dive plus a compass and slate accessory set
  • Make sure you have plenty of promotional materials inside and outside your store to advertise your adventure dives. You never know when you’ll spark the interest of divers who are passing by. Don’t forget to make use of the various marketing tools available to help promote Adventure Dives to new and existing customers.

For information on the training requirements for teaching Adventure Dives contact [email protected].

Training Insights… Adventures in Diving Part 2: How easy is it to teach the theory?

How easy is it to teach the theory for these adventure dives?

Very! The easiest way to get started is to have your students register for Advanced Open Water Diver Online (PADI’s eLearning option) to get started immediately.

The web-based system will allow them to learn about seven of the most popular Adventure Dives via an easy to use, interactive online program. The program inclddes videos, audio, pictures and text, plus short quizzes to allow them to gauge their progress and review and correct anything they might happen to miss. This lets them move through the program efficiently and at their own pace.

The adventure dives included in the PADI Open Water Diver Online modules are:

  • Deep
  • Underwater Navigation
  • Night Diver
  • Peak Performance Buoyancy
  • Wreck Diver
  • Underwater Naturalist

They will also have access to an online version of the Adventures in Diving manual and can complete sections for other Adventure Dives as directed by you, the PADI Instructor.

The eLearning course will be available for one year from the time of course registration (though they will have permanent access to their online Adventures in Diving manual).

Once completed, you will be notified that the student has finished and they will be given an eRecord which they can print and bring with them to the dive center.

To finish, simply schedule sessions with your students to review their knowledge development before going on to complete their Adventure Dives.

Don’t forget to make use of the various marketing tools available to help promote Adventure Dives to new and existing customers. For information on the training requirements for teaching Adventure Dives contact [email protected].

Training Insights… Adventures in Diving Part 1: Why teach Adventure Dives?

Have you always wanted to teach a wider variety of diving activities, rather than just DSDs and PADI Open Water Diver courses? If you have a favourite underwater hobby such as digital underwater photography, fish identification or wreck diving, there’s a long list of scuba adventures you can take part in by teaching this program. Not only does this mean you’ll get to do even more of what you love, but you’ll get to share your passion with your students, too.

Don’t forget that if your student completes three Adventure Dives they can earn the Adventure Diver certification (a subset of the PADI Advanced Open Water Diver course). Each Adventure Dive may also be credited towards the first dive of the corresponding PADI Specialty Diver Course and vice versa.

Teaching Adventure Dives is therefore not just a way to progress students’ training opportunities, but is also a great opportunity to encourage your students to try new things, build on their existing scuba skills and gain more confidence overall. Your enthusiasm will help them enjoy scuba diving more than ever.

* Do remember to check your PADI Instructor Manual key standards. PADI (Junior) divers may only participate in certain Adventures Dives.

Don’t forget to make use of the various marketing tools available to help promote Adventure Dives to new and existing customers. For information on the training requirements for teaching Adventure Dives contact [email protected].

Training Insights… EFR: What is an Emergency First Response Distinctive?

warehouse-injuryIf you have identified a particular need in your local market and have the expertise to write a course to address those needs, you can develop an EFR Distinctive specialty course.

Perhaps you want to teach first aid to people who regularly take part in another activity (such as another sport or hobby, or a specific occupation) and think they need additional focus on some skills. Alternatively, you might have some customers asking you to teach a particular course or skill.

EFR_72010_lWhatever your reason for wanting to create a bespoke EFR course for your customers, simply let us know about your idea and we can help you develop this further. You don’t have to be a medical professional and courses are often based upon EFR core courses supported by additional scenarios or modules that you’ve contributed.

If you’ve not harnessed the potential of EFR then get started today. For information on the training requirements for EFR courses or for advice on writing your own EFR Distinctive specialty course, please contact [email protected].

Training Insights… EFR: What are the different Emergency First Response courses?

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If you’ve been considering expanding your dive operation to include Emergency First Response (EFR) courses but are unsure of what courses are available, check out the guide below:

  • booth3541-cmykPrimary Care is a course covering life threatening conditions and focuses on a simple set of priorities (ABCABS) so that emergency providers know what to do and when.
  • Secondary Care is all about non-life threatening conditions. Providers learn how to look after victims until the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) arrive, and how to monitor and prevent further injury.
  • Primary and Secondary Care is the most common combination and is a prerequisite for PADI Rescue Diver, Divemaster and Emergency First Response Instructor levels.
  • Care for Children is a primary and secondary course focused on infants and children. It can be combined with other courses or run separately.
  • IMG0007-cmykCPR and AED is a short course focused just on CPR and the use of AEDs (Automated External Defibrillators). It is an ideal introduction to first aid training.
  • Regional courses are courses that meet specific regional needs, such as workplace first aid requirements or training for child care professionals. Check out the EFR website to see what is available in your area.

If you’ve not harnessed the potential of EFR then get started today. For information on the training requirements for EFR courses, please contact [email protected].

Training Insights… EFR: Who else can you offer Emergency First Response courses to?

shutterstock_284644667Ask any of your customers (divers or non-divers) if they would know what to do if one of their friends or family had a medical emergency, and have the confidence to feel prepared. None of us like to think that we couldn’t help.

Emergency First Response (EFR) courses are a great way to get the non-diving friends and family of your existing customers involved in your dive centre, and act as an ice-breaker for introducing them to your dive crew and buddies.

Three Ideas for Broadening your Audience…

  • DSC02513Parents are keen to understand how they can be prepared to help their kids in times of need – why not offer the Care for Children course just for them?
  • In many countries, CPR and First Aid training is being introduced earlier into school curriculums. Try approaching your local school to offer training to your divers’ children, other children and even teachers! The Emergency First Response system has all the tools to keep kids engaged in the training – just check to make sure your schedule is suitable for the age and attention span of a younger audience.
  • shutterstock_228031189Good health may deteriorate as we get older and being prepared for potential emergencies can provide a welcome reassurance. Those who have already retired may find themselves with some extra time on their hands… perfect for completing and maintain their CPR and First Aid training.

If you’ve not harnessed the potential of EFR then get started today. For information on the training requirements for EFR courses, please contact [email protected].

Training Insights… EFR: Do you think EFR won’t work in your business?

RDOnLn0310_0635If you don’t think that teaching Emergency First Response (EFR) courses is possible within your business because of scheduling or location restrictions, try these tips to help integrate the program into your course offerings:

  • Start or finish each day with an hour or two of EFR. This can either give you a gentle start to the day until everyone has woken up and is ready to dive, or a chance to wind down and have fun at the end the day.
  • Introduce the skills one at a time, throughout the PADI Rescue Diver course. They can be done in almost any location: at the dive site, on the boat, in the dive centre – anywhere you have some floor space and, for some skills, a mannequin available.
  • EFR courses can be run in the evenings or on days where diving is stopped due to weather conditions. You can schedule the EFR course for a particular day so that it’s in the diary – but explain that you may do it earlier if weather conditions make it hard to dive, and remain flexible to teaching opportunities for the EFR sessions.

If you’ve not harnessed the potential of EFR then get started today. For information on the training requirements for EFR courses, please contact [email protected].

Training Insights… EFR: Why teach Emergency First Response (EFR) Courses to Rescue Divers?

EFRMay05_99Emergency First Response (EFR) courses offer an outstanding set of course materials and the same well-researched and respected educational system as PADI courses. Both of these factors make learning CPR and First Aid simple for your divers and also make it easy and fun to teach.

Opportunities with potential Rescue Divers

Although some PADI Rescue Diver students may come to you with a current CPR and First Aid certification, many of them will never have studied these essential skills, or may otherwise need them refreshed. EFR is the perfect tool with which to address their needs.

If you don’t integrate EFR as part of your course offerings, then you’ll need to send your students elsewhere to complete this element of their training. This means you’ll lose out on EFR-generated profit to your business and the opportunity to build relationships with that customer. It goes without saying that turning your customers away to another business comes with the risk of losing that customer for future diving courses, too.

Integrating EFR courses into your dive business

Being an EFR Instructor is a requirement for PADI Instructors, which means you’ll very likely have the resources you need within your existing dive team.

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EFR courses are incredibly flexible and don’t require any in-water sessions, so you can really tailor them to fit around your existing schedule and courses, and use them to fill in off-peak seasons when diving might be less frequent. You could opt to integrate EFR into the Rescue Diver course itself, split it into smaller sections over several days (or even weeks), or run it all in one across a weekend. Choose whichever suits your business – and customers – the best.

If you’ve not harnessed the potential of EFR then get started today. For information on the training requirements for EFR courses, please contact [email protected].

Training Insights… Rescue Diver Part 7: What is a Rescue Diver?

By the end of the PADI Rescue Diver course your students will have mastered all the skills and knowledge in the course, but they will not be perfect. Divers should understand that following the guidelines and being willing to try are more important than being technically perfect.

Rescue Divers are divers that have mastered personal skills, buddy skills and have been introduced to rescue management skills. These divers are ideal to move onto a Master Scuba Diver, Divemaster or TecRec course. Don’t try to force them, but do chat to them, emphasise the value of the skills they have and ask them where they would like to go next.

This article concludes our Training Insights… Rescue Diver series. Here’s a recap on the previous blogs in this series. Save these links and use them as a refresher for new and experienced PADI Pros within your business:

RDOnLn0310_1204Part 1: Who are our potential PADI Rescue Divers?

Part 2: How do you get divers interested in the course?

Part 3: What does the Rescue Diver course consist of?

Part 4: Skills Review and Development

Part 5: Applying Knowledge and Skills

Part 6: Rescue Techniques

If you haven’t done so already, make sure you download your free marketing toolkit to help promote the PADI Rescue Diver course to potential students. For any enquiries about the toolkit please contact [email protected]

For more information on the training requirements for PADI courses, please contact [email protected].

Training Insights… PADI Rescue Diver Part 6: Rescue Techniques

RDOnLn0310_1493There are often many different techniques that divers can use to meet the performance requirements with the PADI Rescue Diver course. You will usually teach one or two techniques that you find the easiest for each skill, but if students achieve the performance requirement by using another method which they find more comfortable, then that’s perfectly acceptable too.

Different training locations, equipment and personal attributes will dictate what the easiest technique is for each individual diver. The PADI Rescue Diver course is all about arming divers with lots of tools so that they can choose the best one to assist in a situation if and when it arises.

Don’t be afraid to ask other divers and instructors how they perform each exercise. Even if you don’t want to use their techniques on a regular basis, by taking note of the variety of options available, you will have a bigger “toolbox” to help divers who are struggling and who might need some fresh suggestions on how to approach a skill.

Check out the PADI Rescue Diver Course Presentation notes and Guide to Teaching for ideas on different techniques you can implement within your teaching sessions.

If you haven’t done so already, make sure you download your free marketing toolkit to help promote the PADI Rescue Diver course to potential students. For any enquiries about the toolkit please contact [email protected]

For more information on the training requirements for PADI courses, please contact [email protected].