PADI Women’s Dive Day: interview with Jilly Healey

2016 PADI Women’s Dive Day is coming up!

With numerous events hosted around the world, the goal is to get as many women as possible, at every level, diving on the same day in order to build awareness and interest for the sport. While the focus is on women, all are encouraged to get involved. It’s a great opportunity to get the women, friends, and family members in your life together for a fun day of diving!

In anticipation of the event on 16th of July 2016, we are interviewing several women who are inspirational to divers and non-divers alike.

Find here below the third in a series of interviews with Jilly Healey – PADI Course Director at Ocean College in Sharm el Sheikh, Egypt.

j1Why/How did you become a PADI Diver?

In 1998 I came on a holiday to Egypt to visit my mum who had already been here awhile. She was working and wanted to find something for me to do so I wouldn’t be bored. She told me I was going to learn to scuba dive, I said no thanks as I just wanted to relax on the beach, I was in the process of selling my bar in the UK and was tired. Mum told me she had paid for the course for my Christmas present so I felt guilty and off I went.

I am not sure I fell in love with diving straight away but I did fall in love with my instructor, he was so passionate about diving that it was impossible not to love it too so I soon fell in love with it also. I left Sharm El Sheikh with my PADI Advanced course completed. I came back 2 months later after selling my bar and started my PADI Rescue then PADI Divemaster course. I am now a PADI Course Director

b (3)What does PADI mean to you?

I think regardless of the organisation if you have a good instructor you will have a good course, but as an instructor I believe PADI offers me the tools and the backup to be a better instructor. The tools PADI have given us are professional and allow me to pass my passion of diving on to my students and change their lives the way my Instructor changed mine.

I have a few ex students who are now good friends that when I think about how their life has changed because of PADI it reminds me of the saying that PADI has that we are in the  “Transformation Business”. One lady in particular when I met her was so quiet, self conscious, so afraid of getting anything wrong that she was a really difficult student to teach, she is now one of the best Instructors I know, she is out going and the life and soul of any social setting  – diving did that to her.

So “What does PADI mean to me?” – it changed mine and so many other peoples lives for the better.

b (2)What does it mean to you to be a female diver?

I do not think of myself as a “female diver“– I am just a diver. I have never been one to not do something because I am female, my Dad said I should have been the boy in the family, but to come to Egypt and work as a female in 1999 there were not so many of us. I had to prove I was strong enough to do the job in the same way the boys could especially in a very male orientated country such as Egypt. But due to the training I was given during my Divemaster course by my instructor and because of the structure of the PADI Divemaster course it set me on a strong path to show I could do it.

One of my favourite compliments was by another member of staff who spoke with the crew of a safari boat who were worried that they were about to get a female safari guide on their boat for the first time and were afraid I wouldn’t be able to tie mooring lines at the SS Thistlegorm. “She is as strong in the water as 100 men, she will tie your lines”

I am so proud to be a diver I tell anyone who sits long enough near me all about it– don’t sit next to me on a plane unless you want to hear all about it.

I wish more women would dive, as it doesn’t matter if you are male or female when you are underwater.

IMG_2546What is your dream dive?

Put me in a swimming pool and I am happy as long as I am in scuba gear, but there are a few places I would love to go. Galapagos, Buenos Aires to name a few. I am not yet bored with Sharm El Sheikh though even after 17 years of working in diving here. Every dive is different, you never know what might turn up whether it be a nudi branch, pipefish, manta, turtle or shark I love it all.

Best moment in diving?

There are so many but for different reasons – the day I became an instructor, the day one of my open water students became an instructor, the day I became a CD (I cried and laughed all at the same time) every time I help a student get over a problem that they were ready to pack the course in and then they pass the course and become a diver and then come back to dive again and again.

But the main thing that pops to mind is when I started diving, my instructor told me I had to make a list of 3 things that I wanted to see in Sharm El Sheikh. I chose a Ghost Pipe Fish, Whale Shark and Hammerhead Shark. The Hammerhead was my first on my birthday as well. Then the Ghost Pipe fish. Then I waited and waited, 10 years of diving everyday and 6000 dives or so later I saw my first whale shark – I was on the dive boat having just finished a dive – I jumped in with mask, fins and snorkel – all anyone could hear out of my snorkel was me crying my heart out and saying “ you are so beautiful I waited 10 years to see you”

The only problem now is that list has been checked but the list got longer – Manatees, Mola Mola, Blue Glaucus Atlanticus, Seals and much more.

zWhat are your plans for WDD this year? As a PADI Instructor, do you have any suggestions for divers for PADI Women’s Dive Day 2016?

My plans are to dive, any place anywhere – it doesn’t matter as long as I get wet.

Suggestions for divers – do the same go get wet and dive you won’t be sorry, a diving day is a great day.

What do you feel are the most important challenges and opportunities facing women in diving?

I don’t think there needs to be challenges for women in diving, so many women icons have paved the way for us now, the challenge should be with yourself. Always challenge yourself to do the next thing, if you don’t you will miss out on a wonderful world.

As for opportunities for women – the world is your oyster, diving opens up so many careers other than being an instructor – marine biology, marine architecture, journalism, photography, film making, marine education and the list goes on.

Clean Up 002How can we get more women in the water and involved in the dive community?

Change the way we advertise diving, show real women diving – not the models exiting the water with perfect make up on. Show that real women are divers. I understand that its aesthetically pleasing to have a beautiful bikini clad young lady to use for advertising but its not real. It seems that most of the women I teach are wives and girlfriends of divers; to me this means we are not reaching other women.

IMG_1196So many women believe they cant carry the equipment, that it would be too heavy – I am 5 ft 2 inches and a technical diver and cave diver I have carried 4 tanks on land, 6 tanks underwater, I dive with 10 years olds that can carry their own tank.

Lets show women of all ages that diving is possible and this can be done though advertising.

Tips to women thinking about a career in diving?

Do it, what’s stopping you. But before you quit your job, you should know that although I love it and wouldn’t give it up for the world a diving career isn’t all fun and excitement. We work with so many different personalities and you need to be able to cope with that and many different circumstances – each day brings something new which is one of the reasons you don’t get bored as a PADI Scuba Instructor. You need to be patient, flexible and smile – you have other people’s life’s dreams in your hands.

If you think you can do that then do it, you wont regret it – the experiences, the memories and the friends you will make will be the best.

IMG_1041Thanks Jilly ….and keep up the good work!

How to Participate
If you’re a diver who is interested in participating in a Women’s Dive Day event, please contact your local PADI Dive Center or Resort to see if it’s holding an event — and encourage it to get involved if it’s not already. Otherwise, you can find an event or get more information at padi.com/women-dive.

If you’re a PADI Professional interested in hosting a dive or event, contact your PADI Regional Manager!

PADI Women’s Dive Day: interview with Nancy Abd El Wahab

 2016 PADI Women’s Dive Day is coming up!

With numerous events hosted around the world, the goal is to get as many women as possible, at every level, diving on the same day in order to build awareness and interest for the sport. While the focus is on women, all are encouraged to get involved. It’s a great opportunity to get the women, friends, and family members in your life together for a fun day of diving!

In anticipation of the event on 16th of July 2016, we are interviewing several women who are inspirational to divers and non-divers alike.

Find here below the second in a series of interviews with Nancy Abd El Wahab – PADI Course Director at Dahab Divers in Dahab, Egypt.

nancy1Why/How did you become a PADI Diver?

When I was a teenager I was a competitive swimmer and I loved watching documentaries about the ocean, such as ones from Hans Hass. Due to my fascination with the underwater world my parents gave me a diving course as a Christmas present at the beginning of the 1990’s. I remember it vividly; it was January and we went to a lake in Germany, the water was 4 degrees cold, there was no visibility and I was wearing a suit that was miles too big for me and broken gloves. Nevertheless, I absolutely loved it!

What does PADI mean to you?

PADI opened up the possibility for me to follow my dream to teach others to become divers and even to teach Scuba Diving Instructors. PADI has always supported my work and the educational system is just fantastic. For me PADI stands for education, adventure, conservation, empowerment and transformation.

nancy3What does it mean to you to be a female diver?

Personally, I would like to see more women at higher professional levels of diving. It is already happening in so many areas of diving, such as technical diving, recreational diving, freediving and hyperbaric medicine to name a few. Women are excelling in areas in diving that have previously been home ground to men. Thus, I am very proud of being a female diver, PADI Instructor and PADI Course Director. I hope that through the passion I have for diving and teaching diving I can inspire other woman.

What is your dream dive?

Definitely Sharks Reef at Ras Mohamed (Egypt), especially during the summer because of all the diversity, the unbelievable amount of fish and amazing colors you  can only see in the Red Sea.

nancy2Best moment in diving?

I had many great moments but by far the best moment was when I took my daughter, Samra, the first time diving when she was 8 year old for her Bubblemaker program. Now she is nearly 20, a TEC diver and she will start her PADI Instructor course with me this summer.

samra2What are your plans for WDD this year? As a PADI Instructor, do you have any suggestions for divers for PADI Women’s Dive Day 2016?

In Dahab I would like to get all my female PADI Instructors friends together to offer the PADI DSD for women only. I believe it is very inspiring and empowering for women to see other women working as Instructors and taking an important role in the diving industry. Since it is one of my life’s greatest pleasures to dive with my daughter I would like to encourage other female divers to take their daughters diving too on this special day.

What do you feel are the most important challenges and opportunities facing women in diving? 

I think, nowadays women are more accepted in the diving industry/world. When I first started diving in Germany women were definitely not given the opportunities that they are given today. However, I still see many countries where female divers are an exception because of cultures where it is not common that men and women participate in the same activities. I believe that we need to find ways to teach more female divers in these cultures and countries, who then can become Instructors. These women can go on and help encourage other women to dive.

nancy5How can we get more women in the water and involved in the dive community?

Throughout the years I have trained many women to become PADI Instructors and I am very proud to see them being passionate about their role as a teacher and that they inspire the next generation of female divers. I did the same with my daughter and she is part of the new generation of female divers. It makes me very proud seeing her and how her diving skills are growing. I think it is a great opportunity for us female professional divers to carry our passion to our daughters and other women who then will be able to carry this passion to more women in their environments, such as Universities or work places.

 Tips to women thinking about a career in diving?

Nothing against men, but the diving industry is a male dominated industry. Thus, women in this industry face more problems then men do. So one of my most important tips is to not get intimidated by the men in the industry. Also, know yourself and have self confidence in yourself and your capabilities because sometimes it might not seem this way. Furthermore, a very useful and great tip is to find a female mentor that can help you answer all your questions, someone you can look up to and that might understand the struggles you are going through. Another thing that was very beneficial to me when I started my diving career is to become friends with many professional female divers, not only in recreational diving but also in technical diving and freediving. This way, you have a group of friends who understand your new life. Moreover, one of the most important aspects of the diving industry (which applies to women as well as men) is networking. Try to do that as much as possible; it’s all about who you know. Finally, do your research about which diving center you want to go to. Check their reputation, sponsorship, internship opportunities, career options, instructors and ask people who have dived with them before. This is extremely important since your standard of education will depend on them.

Thanks Nancy ….and keep up the good work!

How to Participate
If you’re a diver who is interested in participating in a Women’s Dive Day event, please contact your local PADI Dive Center or Resort to see if it’s holding an event — and encourage it to get involved if it’s not already. Otherwise, you can find an event or get more information at padi.com/women-dive.

If you’re a PADI Professional interested in hosting a dive or event, contact your PADI Regional Manager!

PADI Women’s Dive Day: interview with Anna Schmitt

2016 PADI Women’s Dive Day is coming up!

With numerous events hosted around the world, the goal is to get as many women as possible, at every level, diving on the same day in order to build awareness and interest for the sport. While the focus is on women, all are encouraged to get involved. It’s a great opportunity to get the women, friends, and family members in your life together for a fun day of diving!

In anticipation of the event on 16th of July 2016, we are interviewing several women who are inspirational to divers and non-divers alike.

Find here below the first in a series of interviews with Anna Schmitt – PADI Course Director at Panorama Divers in Hurghada, Egypt.

IMG_9485

Anna, why and how did you become a PADI Diver?

On my first visit to Egypt, I decided to try diving, as I was obviously in one of the best locations to start my diving story. I followed the PADI DSD programme. From the moment I took my first breath under the water, I realised that my life would not be the same again. A strong desire to discover the undersea world became my ambition.  The more dives I made the more I realised that I wanted to become directly involved in marine conservation issues by making changes and sharing my experiences with others. This really contributed to inspiring me to become a PADI Instructor in the future.

IMG_2284What does PADI mean to you?

It depends on which perspective I look at the question.

During my diving history with the guidance of amazing PADI Instructors, I overcame my anxieties and difficulties in the courses. PADI gave me the most comfortable, safe and easy way to progress through the various diving levels, keeping me interested, confident and eager to learn more.

IMG_2712Now if I look at PADI from my current level as Course Director, I feel responsible for maintaining the high standards set by PADI and to ensure the next generation of Instructors follow the same philosophy. For me PADI is a great support network and provides me with all the educational tools for teaching, encouraging and inspiring new PADI professionals.

What does it mean to you to be a female diver?

Traditionally diving was thought to be a male dominated recreation and profession. Female divers have proved that this is not the case. Being female, I think, brings more empathy and caring attitudes into diving.  Nurturing & protection is a natural instinct to most women, which is exactly my case. Being a female diver, it gives me confidence, independence, freedom and new opportunities to live my dream.

IMG_2746What is your dream dive?

Personally I think any dive can be a dream dive. Entering the water and being at one with the ocean brings peace and tranquillity in a normally hectic & noisy world. The stresses and worries of everyday life are left far behind. My dreams come true every time I dive because I have been given the opportunity to experience another universe under the waves.

WDD AnnaBest moment in diving?

As I begin to descend the first few minutes of any dive are the best moments, when a world of silence surrounds and envelopes me: no expectations, no promises – just being open with your heart and mind, a great opportunity to feel free.

What are your plans for WDD this year?

We have already scheduled our WDD on the PADI web site, so anyone who is interested can join us. We will spend a beautiful day on the boat with female non divers taking the opportunity to try diving for the very first time by conducting   DSD programmes. In the following days, as a special offer, OWD courses will be conducted for all those women who would like to continue their diving experiences. We haven’t forgotten about some female divers who may not have dived for a while, so Scuba Reactivate programmes will also be available.

IMG_2670As a PADI Instructor, do you have any suggestions for divers for PADI Women’s Dive Day 2016?

Very often with the routine of our daily lives we find excuses or reasons to put off until a later date something that we could do now. July 16th could become your day to have a life changing experience, don’t miss this opportunity.

What do you feel are the most important challenges and opportunities facing women in diving?

Women’s dive experience shows, that if there are any challenges in diving, they have already overcome them. So any challenges left are only there, because you believe they are there. Give yourself a green light and go for it.

The opportunities are limited only by how far you want to go: exploration, travel, employment, independence, education both personal & the ability to educate others. Builds confidence & forges friendships.

IMG_6631How can we get more women in the water and involved in the dive community?

Encourage more WDD type events throughout the year. I am sure there must be many women who would love to try diving or would like to get back into diving. Offer “family” dive days as many women have children and these youngsters could well be the next generation of divers. Offer dives and classroom sessions after school hours and special weekend events so that families can attend.

Tips to women thinking about a career in diving?

If you really want to do it, don’t wait go for it! It is a wonderfully rewarding career. Opens the doors of opportunity for travel, to teach & enables you to pass on your wealth of diving experiences. Can allow you to dive in different conditions and climates and to work with other people who feel as passionately about the oceans as you do. Find your freedom, live your dreams.

 

Thanks a lot Anna ….and keep up the good work!

 

Elite Instructor Interview: Chris Azab, PADI Course Director

chris-azab-header

Chris Azab, a highly experienced PADI Course Director and Tec Deep/Trimix Instructor, has been diving “a long time” and was awarded the status of PADI Elite Instructor 2015 earlier this year, an award which recognises the achievements of PADI’s top performing instructors around the world.

With an impressive 11,000+ dives in her logbook, Chris conducts Instructor Development Courses in the Netherlands and Egypt, teaching in her mother tongue of Dutch as well as English, German and Arabic.

PADI Regional Manager Teo Brambilla caught up with her to learn more about her achievements as a PADI Pro, and what being a PADI Elite Instructor means to her.


chris-azab-studentsWhat inspired you to become a PADI Professional?

Ever since I started diving in 1998, I’ve loved the underwater world and its beautiful creatures. I wanted to show them to other people, so in 2001 I became a PADI Pro.

How do you think you’ve changed – personally and professionally – as you’ve moved up the ranks to become a PADI Elite Instructor?

Personally, I’ve changed my whole life! I was working for a banking and insurance company, and chose a different lifestyle. Since 2004 I have been working full time in the diving industry, making people happy. I’m always proud of what I’m doing; working as a professional teacher, thinking positively all of the time – that’s how I reached the PADI Elite Instructor status.

chris-azab-studentWhich PADI courses do you enjoy teaching the most, and why?

I love to teach new PADI Instructor candidates, that’s why I became a PADI Course Director – I see so many positive changes in people. Another favourite is the Tec Sidemount course, it’s great to do dives with more tanks on the side before moving on to further Tec courses.

What do you consider your greatest achievement in your diving career?

Becoming a Silver PADI Course Director and PADI Tec Trimix Instructor. One day I hope to achieve Gold status, and then Platinum. Teaching people is my passion!

chris-azab3What does diving give you that nothing else does?

During diving, it’s the silence… and then after each dive I love the smile on each diver’s face. And that’s the same for teaching, as well – seeing that smile.

Did you have to overcome any fears, challenges or obstacles to get where you are now?

When I started my PADI Advanced Open Water Diver course, the Night Adventure Dive was mandatory, but I really didn’t want to do it. I reached two meters and quit the dive, but I still wanted to become an Advanced Open Water Diver… My PADI Instructor took me to Marseille, France, and let me try it again. I succeeded – not with pleasure, but I did it. The next night dive I booked was during a holiday in Egypt, and from that moment forgot my fears and I’ve found night diving great ever since.

chris-azab2Do you believe you change others’ lives through teaching scuba diving?

Absolutely. Students change from shy to confident, and I’ve had students suffering from depression turn into positive and active people. Some become PADI Instructors, quitting their jobs and travelling around the world. Some even started their own PADI Dive Center. I’ve given students the power to overcome any fear, I’ve given disabled students freedom, and helped people become positive. That’s why I want to do this job as long as I can – it’s amazing to change lives.

How does it feel to be recognised as one of PADI’s Elite Instructors in 2015?

It’s a result of hard work… being a real PADI Professional with quality teaching. I’m proud of it!

What would you say to other PADI Instructors hoping to become Elite Instructors?

Follow your heart and your dream. You are your only limit.

And finally, what does “my PADI” mean to you?

“My PADI” is my way of living. It’s a lifestyle, supported and promoted by PADI and I’m proud to be a part of it. I want to follow this lifestyle as long as I can. It’s not always easy, but I’d still choose this life. It’s an adventure as well, so let’s go for it. I remember the words from my PADI Open Water Diver course a long time ago and they still count; meet people, go places and do things. So, for now, I’m on my way to Malta…


Find out more about the 2016 PADI Elite Instructor Award.

Find out more about Chris Azab via her website.

5 Tips for Pros: How to Maintain Your Scuba Gear Properly

dive-equipment

As a PADI Professional, your scuba gear is exposed to heavy use – much more than the average recreational diver. Three or five dives a day teaching students or guiding certified divers will quickly leave their mark, and you’ll notice your diving equipment ageing much quicker than usual.

Of course, you can help to counteract this wear and tear with proper maintenance of your dive equipment, allowing you to get the best results from your gear despite the high strain.

Above all you shouldn’t forget that you always have a role model function as a PADI Pro, and your scuba gear in particular should always be exemplary: clean, well maintained and fully functional. This way you show your students and other divers that you’re a conscientious diving professional, and demonstrate the importance of well-maintained diving gear.

Here are 5 tips on properly caring for your scuba equipment:

#1 – Rinse your diving equipment thoroughly after every dive

It doesn’t matter if you’re diving in fresh or salt water; clean your scuba gear with clean water after every dive. This will help to remove dirt and other contaminants like micro-organisms or stinging particles from coral or jellyfish. It also helps to prevent the unwanted formation of salt crystal build-up after open water dives in the ocean.

#2 – Dry your diving equipment after every dive

neoprene-careSure, it can difficult as a PADI Pro to do this if you use your diving equipment multiple times during the day. But in between your dives, try to dry out your gear as well as you can. When dive gear is kept damp (especially when stored), bacteria or fungi can quickly develop and spread, which not only damages your diving equipment but can also trigger infections and irritations to your skin.

To dry your scuba gear hang it up outside, ideally in a dry and breezy place but not directly in blazing sunshine. Sunlight can cause faster ageing of materials and can make neoprene and rubber parts brittle.

scuba-equipment#3 – Check any moving parts regularly for dirt and defects

At least once a day, you should make sure that all moving parts on your diving equipment (such as buckles on your BCD, inflator buttons, regulator purge buttons etc.) are clean and working properly. That way you’ll be reassured that there are no dirt, sand or salt crystals stuck in your diving gear that might cause a malfunction during a dive.

#4 – Deep-clean and maintain your diving equipment on a regular basis

In addition to rinsing your kit with clean fresh water after each dive, you should also wash your gear thoroughly at least once a week with a special cleaner designed for dive equipment. This applies not only for neoprene suits, but also for your BCD.

scuba-gear#5 – Store your diving equipment properly

Between dives – and especially if you’re taking some time away from teaching – you should ensure that your gear is stored properly to avoid damage and deformation of the material. Make sure it’s completely dry before packing it away (see #2), don’t stand your fins on the blade-end (as they’ll bend out of shape), and ensure the glass in your diving mask is protected from being scratched.

In addition to these 5 tips, you should always be very careful when carrying and using your diving equipment. Strong impact can easily damage your gear, especially the small components in your BCD and regulator.

PADI’s Equipment Specialist Touch is a great tool to help refresh your memory on maintenance techniques, even as a PADI Professional. It’s also a valuable teaching aid to use with your students to help them learn the importance of caring for their scuba equipment.


christian_huboThis article was written by guest blogger, Christian Hubo. A PADI diving instructor, Christian has enjoyed over 4,000 dives whilst travelling around the world. Above the surface, he’s hiked thousands of kilometers across the natural world. Christian is a freelance web and media designer, underwater photographer, social media and marketing consultant and freelance author. His magazine articles and blog, Feel4Nature, inspires people to follow an independent, individual and eco-conscious lifestyle.

What is a PADI AmbassaDiver?

AmbassaDiver_Hor_Logo_RedBlk - CopyLast week we launched our search for our PADI AmbassaDiver! We are looking for Pro divers and divers who really make a difference and have a story to tell. But what does it all mean?

As a PADI AmbassaDiver, you will be representing what PADI stands for. A passion for the ocean, safe diving and a constant desire for new adventures. You will be introduced as an AmbassaDiver on the official PADI blog where we will highlight your projects and your story. We will keep up with your adventures and the way you influence the diving community all year. You will also receive exclusive PADI AmbassaDiver merchandise.

You will be a part of all the new product releases, engage with the PADI news, and be invited to talk at events such as PADI member updates or PADI Go pro night. You will be a brand advocate of PADI through social platforms, events and relevant engagements and will be expected to use said social platforms to bring brand awareness as AmbassaDivers are passionate about diving, exploration and adventure, and sharing their love of the sport and the ocean planet is one of their greatest joys.

PADI AmbassaDivers are leaders in the dive industry or local communities and will be elected based on their abilities to influence, engage and inspire others to start and keep diving.

Through passion and dedication, PADI Brand Ambassadors are changing the world of diving or changing the world through diving.

Application Procedures:

Applicants for the PADI AmbassaDiver program should be certified by PADI and able to show a strong social media following and/or significant contributions to scuba diving or related areas.

Download the application here and send an email to [email protected] telling us why we should choose you!

1QUJ16_Ambass_full2.eps

Congratulations to PADI’s Top Certifying Instructors in 2015

Go_Pro_CAY07_1136_TS_KingWorld_LGTop certifying PADI Instructors will soon be receiving their Elite Instructor Award. This award celebrates the achievements of PADI Instructors who issued 50, 100, 150, 200 or 300+ certifications during 2015.

The Elite Instructor Award distinguishes PADI professionals by highlighting their experience as PADI Members and gives them the means to promote their elite status to student divers, potential students, prospective employers and others. Elite Instructor Award recipients receive an acknowledgement letter and recognition certificate (both signed by PADI President and Chief Executive Officer Dr. Drew Richardson), a decal to add to their instructor cards, and an e-badge they may use on emails, websites, blogs and social media pages. Elite award instructors may authorize PADI Dive Centres or Resorts with which they associate to display their Elite Instructor Award on the business’ digital site as well.

Check out the 2015 Global Elite Instructor Recipient List to see who earned an award for their 2015 certifications. Listed PADI Instructors can go to the “My Account” tab on this site to download their 2015 Elite Instructor e-badge, and should also be able to see their e-badge on their PADI Pro Chek results page.

Visit the PADI Elite Instructor information page to read about the program.

padi-elite-instructors-2015

5 Tips for your PADI Pro CV & Job Applications

GO_PRO_02

Are you searching for a job in the diving industry? As a PADI Pro, you’re already on the right path to your dream career, with incredible opportunities for PADI Divemasters/Instructors.

Of course, as with any “dream job”, there are a lot of other diving professionals who will be competing for the best and most interesting diving jobs in the world – just like you. So, it’s particularly important that you give the best possible impression with your application documents and stand out from the masses of candidates.

To help you succeed in being top of the shortlist, here are 5 tips for your professional CV and application:

#1 Make it look professional

As a PADI Pro you carry a lot of responsibility, and you’ll need to gain the confidence of your customers and guests with a professional attitude. Make sure your CV reflects your professionalism and follow the guidelines that potential employers will expect.

Include an interesting cover letter, a curriculum vitae (CV) with the right amount of detail, and a professional portrait photo of yourself. Check your spelling and grammar, and make sure your documents are well-presented so that they are neat and clear to read.

#2 Keep it short and simple, but be creative

shutterstock_282305675Your potential employer – the owner of dive shop or liveaboard, or the personnel manager in charge – usually have busy days and very long working hours. So, they won’t have much time to make their first selection of candidates based on the applications they receive.

For this reason, it’s especially important for your application documents to be brief. Include all of your information and why you are the right person for the job – “short and sweet” and to the point. To get the added benefit, add some (professional) creativity to your application so that it will be unmistakable.

My tip: search the internet for a wealth of creative templates for your application that will help your structure and creativity whilst covering the main points in #1.

#3 Use a reputable photo in your application

T-shirts, shorts and sunglasses are, in many parts of the world, the work clothes for a professional scuba instructor… but on your application photograph you shouldn’t aim for “cool”. It’s essential your future employer can easily identify you from your photography and see – at a glance – that you would make a professional and respectable candidate for their PADI Divemaster or Instructor.

Use a normal passport photograph, and even better, add an additional full-length shot in smart, professional clothing.

#4 Watch your file size

imagesSome of the finest diving spots on our planet are often off-the-beaten-track and in isolated areas where the internet is not as fast as you might be used to back home. For that reason, make sure the file size of any digital applications – including your CV and any photos – are not too large. Avoid any applications which are larger than 1MB.

Sending your documents in PDF file format will help to keep the file size small and helps to ensure your future employer will be able to open and read it without needing special software.

#5 Don’t forget your additional skills

A lot of PADI Pros make the same mistake when applying for a new job: they only list their diving qualifications and skills. However, including your additional skills will say a lot about you as a person and could be crucial to helping you win your dream job.

Are you an experienced photographer or videographer – perhaps even underwater? Are you familiar with certain types of computers, applications or gadgets? Maybe you’re a carpenter, engineer or even a nurse? Make sure you’re showcasing all of your skills and talents – just in case!


christian_huboThis article is a translation of this article written by guest blogger, Christian Hubo. A PADI diving instructor, Christian has enjoyed over 4,000 dives whilst travelling around the world. Above the surface, he’s hiked thousands of kilometers across the natural world. Christian is a freelance web and media designer, underwater photographer, social media and marketing consultant and freelance author. His magazine articles and blog, Feel4Nature, inspires people to follow an independent, individual and eco-conscious lifestyle.

Pro Dive-PE Reaches its 10,000 PADI Diver Certification Milestone!

Pro Dive-PE (Port Elizabeth), one of South Africa’s largest dive centers, has recently reached its 10,000 PADI Diver Certification Milestone. Pro Dive’s passion for diving means it has become one of South Africa’s most popular diver training facilities, offering a full range of PADI courses from entry level to Instructor, including PADI Specialties.

Pro Dive also has a facility in Plettenberg Bay, within the Beacon Isle Hotel, which offers shore dives, boat dives and on-site introductions to diving.

As well as superb diver training and diving experiences, Pro Dive offers those who want to dive regularly, a dive club. The Pro Dive Club rewards its divers with special offers and deals on equipment and dive packages, making it very affordable for people to log dives.

PADI is proud to call Pro Dive a PADI 5 Star Dive Centre and looks forward to working with the Dive Centre to achieve its next 10,000 certifications!

My Top 3 EMEA Dives – Part 3: The Zenobia, Cyprus (Guest blog by Alexandra Dimitriou-Engeler)

In this article, guest blogger Alexandra Dimitriou-Engeler concludes her list of top 3 dives in the Europe, Middle East and Africa region. Missed the previous articles? Catch up on Part 1 and Part 2.


Dive Site: Zenobia Wreck

Location: Larnaca, Cyprus
Description: Wreck
Length: 174 meters
Depth: 18 – 42 meters

The Zenobia wreck is one of the top wreck dives on the planet, originally a roll on-roll off (RO-RO) ferry, not unlike the ferries that service the Dover-Calais route between the UK and France.

She sank in 42 meters of water in Larnaca, Cyprus on her maiden voyage in June, 1980 after departing from Malmo, Sweden. Her final destination was Tartous, Syria but she never made it; after just a short while at sea her captain noticed severe steering problems. Investigations showed that the ballast tanks on the port side were filling with water, and there was nothing they could do to stop it.

Continue reading